“Except in pure mathematics, nothing is known for certain….” // Carl Sagan

By | 25th December 2017

“The scientific way of thinking is at once imaginative and disciplined. This is central to to its success. Science invites us to let the facts in, even when they don’t conform to our preconceptions. It counsels us to carry alternative hypotheses in our heads and see which best fit the facts. It urges on us a delicate balance between no-holds-barred openness to new ideas, however heretical, and the most rigorous skeptical scrutiny of everything — new ideas and established wisdom….

One of the reasons for its success is that science has built-in, error-correcting machinery at its very heart. Some may consider this an overbroad characterization, but to me every time we exercise self-criticism, every time we test our ideas against the outside world, we are doing science. When we are self-indulgent and uncritical, when we confuse hopes and facts, we slide into pseudoscience and superstition.

Every time a scientific paper presents a bit of data, it’s accompanied by an error bar — a quiet insistent reminded that no knowledge is complete or perfect….”

— Carl Sagan (“The Demon-Haunted World”)

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